Too Late, Too Little: Too Much, Too Soon

We Need an Improved Medicare

Introduction
We should all be looking at ways we can increase the quality of our medical care and decrease the costs at least to equal the accomplishments of the rest of the industrialized world. It makes sense to work on improving Medicare so that when we finally exhaust all of the other alternatives (the American way) and adopt a single payer system, “Improved Medicare for All” we will already have accomplished a lot of the improvement. But Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), while administering Medicare and the Affordable Care Act, seems determined to spend a lot of money on “experiments” that don’t even make sense much less have any evidence to suggest that they are viable.  And they seem to spend no effort on predicting unintentional consequences. The effect of these diversions is going to be a further degradation of the medical care available not only to the Medicare eligible but to the entire population. The latest example is the new twist on Chronic Care Management (CCM) services. This was recently discussed in the New York Times in an article by Robert Pear, published August 16, 2014.  This is a plan to pay doctors a separate fee of $41.92 a month for managing the chronic care of some Medicare patients after January 1, 2015. This is for non face-to-face development and revision of care plans, communication with other care providers, prescription drug management, etc. see ADDENDUM. It will be classified as a G code with the description,” Chronic care management services furnished to patients with multiple (two or more) chronic conditions expected to last at least 12 months, or until the death of the patient, that place the patient at significant risk of death, acute exacerbation/ decompensation, or functional decline; 20 minutes or more; per 30 days.”

Background
There is no question that care coordination is an increasing problem as patient care has transitioned to specialists and hospitals. Medical care of patients with chronic conditions is especially disjointed and plagued with discontinuities. This breakdown in care over the last 20 years has occurred as primary care, basically family practice, has been driven back to an office based medicine with little communication with hospitals, specialists, urgent care centers and other health care providers.

The Problems
The creators of this program have done an excellent job of incorporating many of the concepts that are being developed for complex ambulatory medical care, including the Leap Project.

Unfortunately the Chronic Care Management formula presents a number of consequences (which should be foreseen);The number of patients who will fall within the eligible parameters will probably be less than half of the Medicare population. And, in turn, the Medicare population represents  16.5% of the total population in the United States.

Excel Table3

This creates two major problems: The small, age defined group of beneficiaries will not provide ample sampling size or randomness to derive useful data for improving chronic care over-all. The additional fixed costs to medical providers for participation will be very high considering the small percentage of their practices affected and the reimbursement limited to the Medicare panel.

The matter of cost to the practitioners will limit participation to large groups and corporations. Rural and underserved areas will again be excluded from some of the benefits of Medicare. Keep in mind that as of 2010 almost half of primary care physicians saw their patients in offices of one or two physicians. Since then, of course, many have left practice.

  • Certified Electronic health records are required in this new plan but practice size is a major determinant of physicians’ use of EMRs and HIT capacity, including exchanging patient information electronically and providing electronic access to their patients. Half of physicians in solo practices report using EMRs, compared to 90 percent of those in practices with 20 or more physicians; likewise, there is a 4-fold difference between solo and large practices in achieving multifunctional HIT capacity (11 vs. 45 percent).
  • Participant practices will have to have a supervised staff person on call, after-hours, 24/7,  to address the “urgent chronic care needs” of the patients.
  • Tremendous amounts of paperwork, manpower and teamwork will be required to monitor, coordinate, and document all of the requirements of this plan. For a recent CMS list of these requirements see the ADDENDUM below.
  • Deborah N. Peikes discovered in her analysis of the similar team-based Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative that “At baseline, most CPC initiative practices used traditional staffing models and did not report having dedicated staff who may be integral to new primary care models, such as care coordinators, health educators, behavioral health specialists, and pharmacists. Without such staff and payment for their services, practices are unlikely to deliver comprehensive, coordinated, and accessible care to patients at a sustainable cost.”

It is understood that from the perspective of Medicare the high costs of the top 20% of the chronic care patients create the greatest expenditure. But our medical cost and care problems are much bigger than this small corner of the landscape. And all we have to help us is CMS with Medicare, Medicaid, and the Affordable Care Act. Of course if we had everyone in and nobody out we could tackle the bigger problems.

This program is serving as a diversion from solving the problem of adequate compensation for primary care in general. Meanwhile, our family practice workforce continues to decline while Nero fiddles. If as much energy had been put into solving the RVU and physician income disparities we could be on our way to re-establishing a primary care base. Unfortunately the new proposal only aggravates these problems. Two of the major factors that are driving medical students away from primary care is the low future income combined with the high student debt.  The third problem is the large burden of office practice administration. The cost of compliance and documentation with all of the existing programs is already overwhelming . This leaves the primary care profession with no time left over to worry about coordination but with a big desire to abandon this field of medicine. CMS has no solution to this and yet they want to add one more program that requires more continuous documentation, appeals of denial to file, cost of extra personnel, etc. CMS states that as part of the new service, doctors will assess patients’ medical, psychological and social needs; check whether they are taking medications as prescribed; monitor the care provided by other doctors; and make arrangements to ensure a smooth transition when patients move from a hospital to their home or to a nursing home. This workload is multiplied by the fact that the target patients are the sickest and oldest. They have a high mortality rate so the paperwork starts all over for the next replacement on the panel. For $42/month.

The Solution
Who in primary care is left to carry out the program?  Basically, it will be members of large group practices and hospital and other institutional employers in urban centers. The growing supply/demand incongruence of available primary care physicians will make that option even more profitable for the physicians. That leaves out the rest of America. And the uninsured and underinsured will continue to be left out in the cold. We need a broader vision. We need an Improved Medicare for All.

ADDENDUM
(CMS Statement)

“To assist stakeholders in commenting, we remind you of the elements of the current scope of service for CCM services that are required in order for a practitioner to bill Medicare for CCM services as finalized in the CY 2014 final rule with comment period. We would note that additional explanation of these elements can be found at 78 FR 74414 through 74428. The CCM service includes:

  • Access to care management services 24-hours-a-day, 7-days-a-week, which means providing beneficiaries with a means to make timely contact with health care providers in the practice to address the patient’s urgent chronic care needs regardless of the time of day or day of the week.
  • Continuity of care with a designated practitioner or member of the care team with whom the patient is able to get successive routine appointments.
  • Care management for chronic conditions including systematic assessment of patient’s medical, functional, and psychosocial needs; system-based approaches to ensure timely receipt of all recommended preventive care services; medication reconciliation with review of adherence and potential interactions; and oversight of patient self-management of medications.
  • Creation of a patient-centered care plan document to assure that care is provided in a way that is congruent with patient choices and values. A plan of care is based on a physical, mental, cognitive, psychosocial, functional and environmental (re)assessment and an inventory of resources and supports. It is a comprehensive plan of care for all health issues.
  • Management of care transitions between and among health care providers and settings, including referrals to other clinicians, follow-up after a beneficiary visit to an emergency department, and follow-up after discharges from hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, or other health care facilities.
  • Coordination with home and community based clinical service providers as appropriate to support a beneficiary’s ’s psychosocial needs and functional deficits.
  • Enhanced opportunities for a beneficiary and any relevant caregiver to communicate with the practitioner regarding the beneficiary’s care through, not only telephone access, but also through the use of secure messaging, internet or other asynchronous non face-to-face consultation methods.Similarly, we remind stakeholders that in the CY 2014 final rule, we established particular billing requirements for CCM services that require the practitioner to:
  • Inform the beneficiary about the availability of the CCM services from the practitioner and obtain his or her written agreement to have the services provided, including the beneficiary’s authorization for the electronic communication of the patient’s medical information with other treating providers as part of care coordination.
  • Document in the patient’s medical record that all of the CCM services were explained and offered to the patient, and note the beneficiary’s decision to accept or decline these services.
  • Provide the beneficiary a written or electronic copy of the care plan and document in the electronic medical record that the care plan was provided to the beneficiary.
  • Inform the beneficiary of the right to stop the CCM services at any time (effective at the end of a 30-day period) and the effect of a revocation of the agreement on CCM services.
  • Inform the beneficiary that only one practitioner can furnish and be paid for these services during the 30-day period. With the addition of the electronic health record element that we are proposing, we believe that these elements of the scope of service for CCM services, when combined with other important federal health and safety regulations, provide sufficient assurance that Medicare beneficiaries receiving CCM services will receive appropriate services. However, we remain interested in receiving public feedback regarding any meaningful elements of the CCM service or beneficiary protections that may be missing from these scope of service elements and billing requirements. We encourage commenters, in recommending additional possible elements or safeguards, to provide as much specific detail as possible regarding their recommendations and how they can be applied to the broad complement of practitioners who may furnish CCM services under the PFS.”
    Federal Register Vol 79 No. 133 July 11, 2014

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